3 Biases You Should Be Aware Of

Photo by Pavan Trikutam on Unsplash

Hey there!

James Clear recently reviewed 5 common biases that we all can suffer with when deciding what to believe, what to support, what to reject and what to act or not act on.

Being aware of these biases might help you with effective critical thinking, and sorting out issues and priorities when we’re planning our actions.

I’d like to add a 6th, and give you the entire list. In the interest of time, I’ll share 3 in this video, and three in the next video I do.

Hope this helps!

David

Responses

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. The first thing I thought of was one of your favorite biases, “Do more of what works and less of what doesn’t.”

    While excellent advice, it tends to reinforce a Survivorship Bias. What you seem to be saying in this video is that it might be at least as important to understand why things didn’t work. It may be easy to identify things that don’t work, but much more difficult to understand why that was, so that anything that resembles or is similar to that is avoided.

    In other words, it may be obvious that Tab-A doesn’t go into Slot-B, but there are lots of other Tabs that won’t go either or it may perfectly fit Slot-C or Slot-A and that might result in a better outcome than what worked for you.

  2. Hey David. Great stuff. My husband is taking classes through Cornell University and he just happens to be studying biases in the Strategic Decision Making Class. We were walking the dog yesterday and he was telling me about it then I watched your video this morning and there you were, discussing the same topic. He plans on sharing your video with his professor as it was interesting that these biases can go by different monikers but have similar meanings. Thanks for all the wonderful coaching. PS; Hubs wants to know if you knew Doug Tracht aka The Greaseman from D.C.

  3. Not only do I know him, he was my promo announcer for my syndicated radio show. Awesome guy, very dirty on the air, but lovely in person.